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Anyone, 5 years of age and older, is eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Find your nearest vaccination location at vaccines.gov.

COVID-19 Outpatient Treatment

Update [4/5/2022] Sotrovimab is no longer authorized to treat COVID-19 in any U.S. region due to increases in the proportion of COVID-19 cases caused by the Omicron BA.2 sub-variant

To search for locations offering COVID-19 therapeutics, please visit COVID-19 Outpatient Therapy Locator or Call 1-800-889-3931 for more information about locating a treatment center near you.

Overview of Monoclonal Antibody and Oral Antiviral Medications for COVID-19 Made Available Under Emergency Use Authorization for Non-Hospitalized Patients

Monoclonal antibody therapy is a prevention as well as treatment option for mild to moderate COVID-19 illness for non-hospitalized people and is a way to lower the chance of progression to severe illness or hospitalization. IDPH continues to encourage health care providers, such as primary care offices, outpatient clinics, urgent care centers, infusion centers, dialysis centers, home health services, and hospitals, to assess their capabilities to provide this treatment to their patients quickly after they have been identified as having COVID-19 and are determined to be high-risk for severe illness or hospitalization.

Monoclonal antibodies are laboratory-made proteins that mimic the immune system’s ability to fight off harmful viruses and bacteria which can cause disease. Currently, there are three monoclonal antibody therapies approved for use under an Emergency Use Authorization, for non-hospitalized patients.

Bebtelovimab (Beb)

On February 11, 2022, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an emergency use authorization for a new Eli Lilly monoclonal antibody, bebtelovimab, for the treatment of COVID-19. Bebtelovimab is for the treatment of mild-to-moderate COVID-19 in adults and pediatric patients (12 years of age and older weighing at least 40 kg, approximately 88 pounds) who are at high-risk for progression to severe COVID-19, including hospitalization or death, and for whom alternative COVID-19 treatment options approved or authorized by FDA are not accessible or clinically appropriate. When used to treat COVID-19 for the authorized population, the known and potential benefits of bebtelovimab outweigh the known and potential risks of such product.

Beb is administered intravenously only. Clinical efficacy data is forthcoming for Beb. This monoclonal antibody is available through intravenous infusions sites and providers around the state.

Evusheld

On December 8, 2021 the FDA issued an emergency use authorization for Evusheld as pre-exposure prophylaxis for prevention of COVID-19 in adults and pediatric individuals (12 years of age and older weighing at least 40 kg, approximately 88 pounds):

  • Who are not currently infected with SARS-CoV-2 and who have not had a known recent exposure to an individual infected with SARS-CoV-2, and
  • Who have moderate to severe immune compromise due to a medical condition or receipt of immunosuppressive medications or treatments and may not mount an adequate immune response to COVID-19 vaccination, or
  • For whom vaccination with any available COVID-19 vaccine, according to the approved or authorized schedule, is not recommended due to a history of severe adverse reaction (e.g., severe allergic reaction) to a COVID-19 vaccine(s) and/or COVID-19 vaccine component(s). The dosage of EVUSHELD for emergency use is 150 mg of tixagevimab and 150 mg of cilgavimab administered as two separate consecutive intramuscular injections, and is available at specialty care centers and hospitals around the state.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (HHS/ASPR) oversees the allocation of these therapeutic and coordinates its distribution. 

Antiviral drugs are a class of medications used specifically to treat viral infections. Their aim is to minimize the symptoms of an infection and to shorten its duration. Antivirals can also work to reduce transmission of the virus. The FDA has issued Emergency Use Authorizations for two antivirals, Paxlovid and Molnupiravir, for the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 in those who are at high risk for progression to severe COVID-19, including hospitalization or death and for whom alternative COVID-19 treatment authorized by FDA are not accessible or clinically appropriate. Antivirals are available by prescription only. Antivirals should be initiated as soon as possible after diagnosis of COVID-19 and within five days of symptom onset.

Paxlovid

Paxlovid (nirmatrelvir co-packaged with ritonavir) is an oral antiviral therapy consisting of two 150mg capsules of nirmatrelvir and one 100 mg capsule of ritonavir (three pills total) taken twice a day for five days to treat COVID-19 in those 12 years and older or weighing 40 kg (~88 pounds) who are at high risk of progressing to severe disease. Paxlovid halts the spread of SARS–CoV–2 resulting in an 88% reduction in hospitalization/death, if taken with five days of symptom onset. Paxlovid is allocated from HHS to states on a two-week cycle schedule. Requests for Paxlovid on the Health Partner Ordering Portal (HPOP) opened on December 22, 2021 and shipping began the week of December 27, 2021.

Molnupiravir

Molnupiravir is an oral antiviral therapy now authorized for the treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19 in adults age 18 years and older, who are at high risk for progressing to severe COVID-19 and for whom alternative COVID-19 treatment options are not accessible or clinically appropriate. It is administered as four 200 mg capsules taken orally every 12 hours for five days, for a total of 40 capsules. This therapy, taken within five days of developing symptoms can result in a 30% reduction in hospitalization/death. Molnupiravir is not authorized for use in those younger than 18 years, or for pregnant or lactating women due to the possibility of fetal harm. Molnupiravir is allocated from HHS to states on a two-week cycle schedule. Requests for Molnupiravir on HPOP began on December 23, 2021 with the first shipments beginning on December 29, 2021.

Health care providers are required to discuss the risks and benefits of all the above products and engage in shared decision making, based on the data in the emergency use authorization (EUA) fact sheets. Health care providers are required to provide the EUA patient fact sheets to the recipients of these products and ensure they understand the information in those fact sheets.

All COVID-19 therapeutics require a prescription from a provider. Please do not go to the pharmacy without a prescription.

These medications are FREE from the federal government and allotted weekly or every two weeks to the state of Illinois. The State then further allocates to providers based on the following metrics:

  • circulating variants of concern
  • urgency of use (e.g. outbreak in a skilled care facility)
  • Prior utilization per teletracking, HPOP, and National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) reports

Remdesivir

Remdesivir is an antiviral that is fully FDA approved for in-patient or hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and now can also be used off-label for non-hospitalized patients to prevent severe COVID-19. It is given as an intravenous infusion (in the vein) once a day for three days. IDPH does not manage allocations for Remdesivir.

Bamlanivimab plus Etesevimab (Bam/Ete)

IMPORTANT UPDATE. On January 24, 2022, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) paused Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for Bamlanivimab and Etesevimab because they are not effective against the Omicron variant. Currently, FDA is not authorizing this treatment for use anywhere in the United States due to the high prevalence of the Omicron variant. These products will no longer be allocated by the federal government. These two products have been shown not to be effective in patients infected with the Omicron variant. According to CDC modeling studies, the Omicron variant is the predominant variant circulating in Illinois.

Casirivimab/Imdevimab (REGEN)

IMPORTANT UPDATE. On January 24, 2022, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) paused Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for REGEN-COV because it is effective against the Omicron variant. Currently, FDA is not authorizing this treatment for use anywhere in the United States due to the high prevalence of the Omicron variant. This products will no longer be allocated by the federal government. According to CDC modeling studies, the Omicron variant is the predominant variant circulating in Illinois.

Related Resources about Monoclonal Antibody Treatments

Updates

Update [4/5/2022] Sotrovimab is no longer authorized to treat COVID-19 in any U.S. region due to increases in the proportion of COVID-19 cases caused by the Omicron BA.2 sub-variant

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Nowcast data from April 5, 2022,  estimates that the proportion of COVID-19 cases caused by the Omicron BA.2 variant is above 50% in all Health and Human Services (HHS) U.S. regions. Data included in the health care provider fact sheet show the authorized dose of Sotrovimab is unlikely to be effective against the BA.2 sub-variant. Due to these data, Sotrovimab is not authorized in any U.S. state or territory at this time.

Health care providers should use other approved or authorized products as they choose appropriate treatment options for patients.

FDA will continue to monitor BA.2 in all U.S. regions and will provide follow-up communication when appropriate.