IDPH COVID-19 Guidance

Considerations for Healthcare Providers in ANY Healthcare Setting

How to leave COVID-19 behind when you come home

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states COVID-19 is typically transmitted through respiratory droplets. Providing patient care during the COVID-19 pandemic means you and your family are at risk for exposure. The ideas or recommendations below, are compiled from CDC guidance and describe how to limit the risk to your family as you return home at the end of your workday.

Contact Tracing

Contact tracing is critical to keeping Illinois healthy and slowing the spread of COVID-19.

Contact tracing provides support that helps protect people and reduce the spread of COVID-19. Trained public health workers are there to answer questions, alleviate concerns, and provide resources to ensure Illinoisans who test positive are safe and taken care of. They also serve as a lifeline to those who may have been exposed by providing helpful information that can protect them and those they care about. By working together, we can make a difference. If you receive a call from IL COVID HELP, answering could save lives.

What is contact tracing?

Contact tracing is a long-established, proven health practice that has helped save countless lives. Public health workers reach out to people who tested positive and their close contacts to provide health guidance, answer questions, and offer support. It helps protect you and those closest to you.

COVID-19 - Elective Surgical Procedure Guidance

This guidance is intended to provide hospitals and ambulatory surgical treatment centers (ASTCs) with a general framework for performing COVID-19 testing prior to non-emergent surgeries and procedures (collectively referred to as “procedures”) and is aligned with guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American College of Surgeons, American Society of Anesthesiologists, and the Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation.

Covid-19 Provisional EMS Certificate

Provisional Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Certificates are NOT an Illinois Department of Public Health IDPH) state license. This is only an EMS system approval recognized by the state.

Who is eligible for a Provisional EMS Certificate?

EMS personnel whose licenses have been expired for less than 60 months as of March 23, 20200 and based on the EMS medical director’s recommendation.

COVID-19 School Graduation Ceremonies Guidance

The outbreak of COVID-19 and subsequent school building closures for the 2019-20 school year have created questions related to graduation ceremonies.

COVID-19 Vaccine

Day Care Guidance

On March 9, 2020, Governor Pritzker declared all counties in Illinois a disaster area in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. On May 29, 2020, the Governor announced Restore Illinois, a comprehensive phased plan to safely reopen the State’s economy, get people back to work, and ease social restrictions. Illinois has now entered the Bridge to Phase V of Restore Illinois. On May 17, 2021, Governor Pritzker issued Executive Order 2021-10, directing day care facilities to follow the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) guidance regarding day cares. Day care facilities include all licensed day care centers, day care homes, group day care homes and license-exempt facilities.

Donation of Convalescent Plasma

Convalescent Plasma for the Treatment of COVID-19 and Donation of Convalescent Plasma
Use of convalescent plasma to treat COVID-19 patients

People who have recovered from COVID-19 have antibodies – proteins the body uses to fight off infections – to the disease in their blood. Doctors call this convalescent plasma. COVID-19 convalescent plasma has not yet been approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is regulated as an investigational product.  A study by Mayo Clinic researchers of 20,000 hospitalized patients transfused with investigational convalescent plasma published in June 2020 concluded there was “robust evidence” it was safe and supported earlier administration of plasma within the clinical course of COVID-19 was “more likely to reduce mortality.” The following pathways are available for the use of COVID-19 convalescent plasma:

Emergency Departments Sexual Assault / Domestic Violence Services

Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Medical Emergency Services Managed in Hospital Emergency Departments During COVID-19 Pandemic

Illinois hospitals work closely with Illinois Coalition Against Sexual Assault (ICASA) rape crisis centers across the state to provide trauma-informed care and treatment for sexual assault survivors pursuant to the Sexual Assault Survivors Emergency Treatment Act (SASETA), 410 ILCCS 70. Hospitals also play an integral part in delivering treatment and care for domestic violence survivors. In order to reassure survivors that hospital emergency departments (EDs) are safe, equipped, and ready to provide treatment for sexual assault and domestic violence during the COVID-19 outbreak, the Illinois Department of Public Health, in consultation with ICASA, the Illinois Health and Hospital Association, and the Illinois Coalition Against Domestic Violence, offers the following guidance.

EMS & First Responder Guidance

This guidance applies to all first responders, including law enforcement, fire services, emergency medical services, and emergency management officials, who anticipate close contact with persons with confirmed or possible COVID-19 in the course of their work.

Background

Emergency medical services (EMS) play a vital role in responding to requests for assistance, triaging patients, and providing emergency medical treatment and transport for ill persons. However, unlike patient care in the controlled environment of a health care facility, care and transports by EMS present unique challenges because of the nature of the setting, enclosed space during transport, frequent need for rapid medical decision-making, interventions with limited information, and a varying range of patient acuity and jurisdictional health care resources.

Pages